MSN - AP World http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a MSN - AP World Copyright © 2010-2018 The Canadian Press. All rights reserved. http://www.rssboard.org/rss-specification Sat, 10 Dec 2022 06:17:10 +0000 US agency announces cuts for Colorado River users http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a/f9dcc0aa81284782b00980ebd19ed2ac The U.S. federal government announced water cuts to states that rely on the Colorado River as drought and climate change leave less water flowing through the river and deplete the reservoirs that store it. (Aug. 16) (AP Video by Brittany Peterson) f9dcc0aa81284782b00980ebd19ed2ac Tue, 16 Aug 2022 22:18:00 +0000 SHOTLIST:RESTRICTION SUMMARY: PART NO RE-SALE, RE-USE OR ARCHIVE; MUST CREDIT KTNV; NO ACCESS LAS VEGAS MARKET; NO USE US BROADCAST NETWORKSASSOCIATED PRESS  ARCHIVE: Page, Arizona – 7 June 20221. Wide of Lake PowellASSOCIATED PRESS  ARCHIVE: Page, Arizona – 8 June 20222. Wide of dam releasing water into Colorado River below Lake PowellASSOCIATED PRESSBoulder, Colorado – 16 August 2022+++PARTIALLY COVERED+++3. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Squillace, University of Colorado, Boulder law professor:"Today we learned that the federal government is poised to impose fairly significant restrictions on water use in the Colorado River basin. They've announced what's called a Tier 2 shortage which is going to requires Arizona, Nevada and the country of Mexico to reduce the amount of water that they're normally allowed to take. And those reductions are fairly significant and it's because we've had this really serious drought on the Colorado River."ASSOCIATED PRESSARCHIVE: Casa Grande, Arizona – 22 July 20214. Farmer Will Thelander looks out over one of his fields5. Detail of Thelander's dry fieldKTNV - NO RE-SALE, RE-USE OR ARCHIVE; MUST CREDIT KTNV; NO ACCESS LAS VEGAS MARKET; NO USE US BROADCAST NETWORKS - ARCHIVE+++MUTE++Las Vegas – 20 July 20226. Wide shot of children playing in large private swimming pool ASSOCIATED PRESS  ARCHIVE: Page, Arizona – 8 June 20227. "Bathtub rings" seen from the water level on Lake PowellASSOCIATED PRESSBoulder, Colorado – 16 August 2022+++PARTIALLY COVERED+++8. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Squillace, University of Colorado, Boulder law professor:"The Bureau of Reclamation is concerned that the reservoirs, the big reservoirs on the Colorado River, are close to losing their ability to produce hydroelectric power."ASSOCIATED PRESS  ARCHIVE: Boulder City, Nevada – 16 December 20219. Hoover Dam with low Lake Mead levels in background ASSOCIATED PRESS  ARCHIVE: Page, Arizona – 8 June 202210. Backside of Glen Canyon Dam and Lake PowellASSOCIATED PRESSBoulder, Colorado – 16 August 2022+++PARTIALLY COVERED+++11. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Squillace, University of Colorado, Boulder law professor:"In addition to the cuts that were announced today, we see the Bureau of Reclamation coming in and not really following through on the commitment that they made to Congress to act unilaterally to try to address some of these serious problems." ASSOCIATED PRESS  ARCHIVE: Page, Arizona – 8 June 202212. Keep Out sign floating on Lake Powell behind Glen Canyon DamASSOCIATED PRESS  ARCHIVE: Boulder City, Nevada – 16 December 202113. "Bathtub rings" shown at Lake Mead ASSOCIATED PRESS  ARCHIVE: Denver– 2 December 202114. Various downtown scenesASSOCIATED PRESSBoulder, Colorado – 16 August 2022+++PARTIALLY COVERED+++15. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Squillace, University of Colorado, Boulder law professor:"I want to say the states have been trying to work together collaboratively, they just haven't managed to address this problem to the degree that it needs to be addressed. We've got to rely on the Bureau to really step up and address this problem. To date they haven't done so. We can hope that perhaps they will do so in the future."ASSOCIATED PRESS  ARCHIVE: Mendocino, California - 4 August 2021 16. Various of downtown MendocinoASSOCIATED PRESS ARCHIVE: Colorado Rocky Mountains -18 April 202217. Snow-covered mountain18. Tree branch with melting snowSTORYLINE:For the second year in a row, Arizona and Nevada will face cuts in the amount of water they can draw from the Colorado River as the West endures an extreme drought, federal officials announced Tuesday.The cuts planned for next year will force states to make critical decisions about where to reduce consumption and whether to prioritize growing cities or agricultural areas. Mexico will also face cuts. This comes as water levels continue to plummet at Lake Mead and Lake Powell, threatening hydropower production. That's not all. In addition to those already-agreed-to cuts, the Bureau of Reclamation said Tuesday that states had missed a deadline to propose at least 15% more cuts needed to keep water levels at the river's storage reservoirs from dropping even more.In June, the federal government gave states an ultimatum to determine how they would impose those cuts, otherwise face unilateral action. Together, the missed deadline and cuts place officials responsible for providing water to growing cities and farms under renewed pressure to plan for a hotter, drier future and a growing population.The Bureau was noncommittal on Tuesday about whether it planned to impose those cuts unilaterally if the states cannot reach agreement.Mark Squillace, law professor at the University of Colorado, Boulder, said he understands the Bureau's desire to be flexible with the deadline, but that it doesn't address the gravity of the issue."We've got to rely on the Bureau to really step up and address this problem," Squillace said. "Today they haven't done so. We can hope that perhaps they will do so in the future."===========================================================Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: info@aparchive.com(ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. The U.S. federal government announced water cuts to states that rely on the Colorado River as drought and climate change leave less water flowing through the river and deplete the reservoirs that store it. (Aug. 16) (AP Video by Brittany Peterson) US agency announces cuts for Colorado River users