MSN - AP World http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a MSN - AP World Copyright © 2010-2018 The Canadian Press. All rights reserved. http://www.rssboard.org/rss-specification Fri, 19 Jul 2019 17:16:37 +0000 D-Day vet tells his story: 'Why am I alive?' http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a/e0b13ac4c20e4a01af1c50c233eddcac For historians, D-Day was a turning point in WWII; for men who were there it remains a kaleidoscope of memories. For D-Day Veteran Frank DeVita, going back to France for the 75th anniversary is an chance to tell his story of horror and triumph. (23 May) e0b13ac4c20e4a01af1c50c233eddcac Fri, 24 May 2019 05:02:26 +0000 RESTRICTION SUMMARY: SEE SHOTLIST SHOTLIST:POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLYARCHIVE Date/Location unknown1. Opening of Weekly Digest newsreel on D-Day POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLYARCHIVE - June 19442. Various of prayer service in Air Force film about the D-day invasion ASSOCIATED PRESSBridgewater, New Jersey - 10 May 20193. SOUNDBITE (English) Frank DeVita, D-Day Veteran:"The morning everybody got on deck and the priest came. And everybody was there: Jews, Catholics, Protestants. It doesn't matter what their denomination you were. You were there for the prayer service." POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLYARCHIVE - Date/Location unknown3. Shot of boats from D-day invasion from a German military news film ASSOCIATED PRESSBridgewater, New Jersey - 10 May 20194. D-day veteran Frank DeVita holding a picture of himself as a young Coast Guard member5. SOUNDBITE (English) Frank DeVita, D-Day Veteran:"My name is Frank Devita, serial number 7015170. I was a gunners mate aboard a Navy ship called the Samuel Chase." POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLYARCHIVE - June 19446. Aerial shot of fleet of boats in the D-day invasion from an Air Force film ASSOCIATED PRESSBridgewater, New Jersey - 10 May 20197. SOUNDBITE (English) Frank DeVita, D-Day Veteran:"At four o'clock in the morning they dropped our boats so we started towards the beach. For two hours when we got probably I would say 200-300 yards from the beach. The Germans opened up with their big guns." ASSOCIATED PRESS - AP CLIENTS ONLYARCHIVE - 19448. Boats in the water POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLYARCHIVE - Date/Location unknown9. D-day invasion from a German military news film ASSOCIATED PRESS - AP CLIENTS ONLYBridgewater, New Jersey - 10 May 201910. SOUNDBITE (English) Frank DeVita, D-Day Veteran:"One guy was maybe two or three feet away from me. He got hit in the stomach with a machine gun, ripped the stomach right open. Somehow this kid lived, I don't know how. He lived there all day. The other kid that was close to me, he was probably maybe a foot away from me. He was not so lucky. Machine Gun took his helmet and half of his face off and he was crying help me, help me, help me. I couldn't help him because I could even help myself. I had nothing. I had no morphine and nothing that helped this kid. So I didn't know what to do. So I remember when my grandmother died they said a prayer. So I started praying: Our Father who art in heaven and it seemed to calm him a few seconds. Then he fell flat and he was at my feet, right there on my feet. I know he's going to die, half of his head was gone. He had red hair and his hair was all full of blood and I don't know what possessed me, I reached down I touched his hand. Because I wanted him to know he wasn't alone. He squeeze my hand as if to say it's all right and he died and he died. He was just a little boy just a little boy and he was dead."   UNIVERSAL ARCHIVES - AP CLIENTS ONLYARCHIVE - 194411. Various of soldiers on boats and getting off boats into water ASSOCIATED PRESS - AP CLIENTS ONLYBridgewater, New Jersey - 10 May 201912. SOUNDBITE (English) Frank DeVita, D-Day Veteran:"On the boat, I got dead and I got wounded and I got live soldiers and they're crying momma, momma, momma. You know everybody thinks you cry to God. When you're dying, you cry momma." ASSOCIATED PRESS - AP CLIENTS ONLYBridgewater, New Jersey - 10 May 201913. SOUNDBITE (English) Frank DeVita, D-Day Veteran:"The whole beach was covered with bodies. Dead and wounded, crying. Some alive, some scared, they didn't want to move. It was a blood bath ASSOCIATED PRESS - AP CLIENTS ONLYARCHIVE - 194414. Various of soldiers and the beach POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLYARCHIVE - Date/Location unknown15. D-day invasion from a German military news film ASSOCIATED PRESS - AP CLIENTS ONLYBridgewater, New Jersey - 10 May 201916. SOUNDBITE (English) Frank DeVita, D-Day Veteran:"The bullets, you could hear bullets go by (DeVita makes the sound of bullets), like that. You could hear them. They whistle." ASSOCIATED PRESS - AP CLIENTS ONLYARCHIVE - 194417. Allied boats in the water ASSOCIATED PRESS - AP CLIENTS ONLYBridgewater, New Jersey - 10 May 201918. SOUNDBITE (English) Frank DeVita, D-Day Veteran:"So now aboard ship. I'm shaking like a leaf. I'm scared. I'm saying to myself: What the hell just happened here, Why am I alive? Why do I have my arms and legs and these guys are all dead around me." ASSOCIATED PRESS  - AP CLIENTS ONLYColleville-Sur-Mer, France - 4 June 201419. Grave yard above Omaha beach Richard DeVita - AP CLIENTS ONLYFrance - Date unknown20. PHOTO of DeVita with two women at a D-Day event ASSOCIATED PRESS - AP CLIENTS ONLYBridgewater, New Jersey - 10 May 201921. SOUNDBITE (English) Frank DeVita, D-Day Veteran:"I want to come back because every time I come back I bring somebody that's never been there before and I see through their eyes. There's a cemetery in Colleville, which is overlooking Omaha Beach and then this cemetery are 94 hundred dead body, marble white marble tombstone. I want you to walk with me in that cemetery. Pick out a tombstone and any tombstone, place your hand and our white marble and say to yourself six feet down, ther is boy probably 20 years old, 19, 20 years old. He gave his life for his country. And then you lift your eyes up and you see 94 hundred white marble tombstones, they all gave their lives country.   ASSOCIATED PRESS  - AP CLIENTS ONLYColleville-Sur-Mer, France - 4 June 201422. Grave yard above Omaha beach Richard DeVita - AP CLIENTS ONLYColleville-Sur-Mer, France -Date unknown23. PHOTO of DeVita in cemetery24. PHOTO of Devita with his hand on grave ASSOCIATED PRESS  - AP CLIENTS ONLYColleville-Sur-Mer, France - 6 June 200625. PHOTO shadow of cross on ground26. PHOTO of graves STORYLINE: Frank DeVita still has nightmares about the 'bloodbath' that was the D-Day invasion. He had wanted to join the Air Force but had no peripheral vision. He wanted to join the Navy but it would take weeks to start basic training. That's how he ended up in the Coast Guard on D-Day, ferrying troops to Omaha Beach. His job was to lower the ramp when the craft got to shore and then raise it after the troops clamored out. But in the early morning hours, as machine gun fire rained down on the boat, that ramp served as DeVita's shield, protecting him and the other men inside. The coxswain screamed at him to lower the ramp, and in the roar of the cannons and the craft's diesel engines, DeVita couldn't hear him. The coxswain screamed again. "On the boat, I got dead and I got wounded and I got live soldiers and they're crying momma, momma, momma. You know everybody thinks you cry to God. When you're dying, you cry momma," DeVita, 94, speaking from his home in Bridgewater, New Jersey. When he finally dropped the ramp, he said 14 or 15 troops were immediately raked by machine gun fire. One soldier fell at his feet, his red hair full of blood: "I reached down and I touched his hand, because I wanted him to know he wasn't alone." Then, when he tried to lift the ramp, it was stuck. DeVita had to crawl over dead bodies lining the bottom of the landing craft to fix it. Again and again, the landing craft ferried men to the beach. When there were no more men to ferry, DeVita and the other sailors pulled bodies from the choppy seas. For decades — until recently — he never spoke of these things. This June he'll make his 12th trip back to Normandy. Eager to keep the memory of what happened there alive, he has often brought others along to places like the American cemetery at Colleville-sur-Mer . "Pick out a tombstone, any tombstone. Place your hand on that white marble and say to yourself, 'Six feet down is a boy.' .... He gave his life for his country and then you lift your eyes up and you see 9,400 white marble tombstones," he said. "They all gave their lives for their country." =========================================================== Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: info@aparchive.com(ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. For historians, D-Day was a turning point in WWII; for men who were there it remains a kaleidoscope of memories. For D-Day Veteran Frank DeVita, going back to France for the 75th anniversary is an chance to tell his story of horror and triumph. (23 May) D-Day vet tells his story: 'Why am I alive?'