MSN - AP World http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a MSN - AP World Copyright © 2010-2018 The Canadian Press. All rights reserved. http://www.rssboard.org/rss-specification Wed, 10 Aug 2022 15:00:49 +0000 South Korea opens presidential palace to public http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a/ce669326141f4774b56cb77e499be1fe For many South Koreans, the former presidential palace in Seoul was a little-visited, heavily-secured mountainside landmark. That's now changed as thousands have been allowed a look inside for the first time in 74 years. ce669326141f4774b56cb77e499be1fe Wed, 18 May 2022 04:37:19 +0000 SHOTLIST:RESTRICTION SUMMARY:ASSOCIATED PRESS Seoul, South Korea – 12 May 20221. Wide of Blue House main building2. People taking photos3. Wide of main buildingANNOTATION: South Korea opened its former presidential palace in Seoul to the public.4. Close of blue roof tiles5. Close of building6. Various of guesthouse SangchunjaeANNOTATION: The Blue House, whose name in Korean means building with blue roof tiles, had been the presidential residence and offices since 1948.7. SOUNDBITE (Korean) Lee Sang Woon, 61, visitor:"I feel grateful that the Blue House has opened to the public for the first time in 74 years. I am really happy to be here after being selected through the competitive lottery (for the Blue House tours)." 8. Various of presidential residenceANNOTATION: The Blue House opening is part of the new South Korean President Yoon Suk Yeol's pledge to abandon the mountainside palace and establish new offices.9. Various of traditional performance10. Wide of people near the gate to the Blue HouseASSOCIATED PRESSSeoul, South Korea – 10 May 202211. Wide of new presidential office buildingANNOTATION: Yoon, who took office on May 10, relocated his new offices to the Defense Ministry compound in Yongsan District, about 5 km (3 miles) away.ASSOCIATED PRESS Seoul, South Korea – 9 May 202212. Various of gate to the new presidential office buildingSTORYLINE:For many South Koreans, the former presidential palace in Seoul was a little-visited, heavily secured mountainside landmark. That's now changed as thousands have been allowed a look inside for the first time in 74 years. As one of his first acts, the new South Korean leader has moved the presidential offices from the Blue House, named after its distinctive blue roof tiles, and opened its gates to the public, allowing a maximum of 39,000 people a day to visit.The normally serious compound has been transformed into something like a fair, with excited crowds looking around and standing in long queues.“I feel grateful that the Blue House has opened to the public," 61-year-old office worker Lee Sang Woon said recently during a tour with his family. "I am really happy to be here.” The Blue House has gone through multiple transformations over the years. Once the site of a royal garden, the Japanese built the official residence for their governors-general there during Tokyo's colonial rule of the Korean Peninsula. After Korea was liberated from Japan in 1945, the U.S. military commander occupied the place until it became South Korea’s official presidential office and residence upon the country’s foundation in 1948.The Blue House opening is part of new South Korean President Yoon Suk Yeol's pledge to abandon the palace and establish his offices at the Defense Ministry compound in the Yongsan district, about 5 kilometers (3 miles) away. ===========================================================Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: info@aparchive.com(ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. For many South Koreans, the former presidential palace in Seoul was a little-visited, heavily-secured mountainside landmark. That's now changed as thousands have been allowed a look inside for the first time in 74 years. South Korea opens presidential palace to public