MSN - AP World http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a MSN - AP World Copyright © 2010-2018 The Canadian Press. All rights reserved. http://www.rssboard.org/rss-specification Mon, 21 Oct 2019 22:20:46 +0000 Police union 'can live with' use of force law http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a/a4d7d9c933cb412782aee68de1f1a288 California Gov. Gavin Newsom has signed a bill designed to decrease the number of deadly shootings by police. The Los Angeles police union says it's a compromise bill that they "can live with." (Aug. 19) a4d7d9c933cb412782aee68de1f1a288 Tue, 20 Aug 2019 02:03:32 +0000 RESTRICTION SUMMARY: PART MUST CREDIT KTXL FOX40, NO ACCESS SACRAMENTO-STOCKTON-MODESTO, NO USE US BROADCAST NETWORKS, NO RE-USE, RE-SALE OR ARCHIVESHOTLISTKTXL - MUST CREDIT KTXL FOX40, NO ACCESS SACRAMENTO-STOCKTON-MODESTO, NO USE US BROADCAST NETWORKS, NO RE-USE, RE-SALE OR ARCHIVESacramento, California - 19 August 20191. SOUNDBITE (English) Gov. Gavin Newsom, (D) California:"It's one thing to sign a piece of paper, pass legislation. It's another to change hearts and minds, to change culture, to change the way people conduct themselves to hold themselves to a higher standard. That's the work that is in front of us. That's the work that's inside of us. That's the work that we collectively as a community need to manifest at peril of missing this moment and missing the point of this moment."2. Various of Gavin Newsom signing billASSOCIATED PRESS – AP CLIENTS ONLYLos Angeles – 19 August 2019++SOUNDBITES SEPARATED BY WHITE FLASHES++3. SOUNDBITE (English) Hannu Tarjamo, Director, Los Angeles Police Protective League: "The original version of AB392 didn't really address a problem. It was punitive in nature in how it was worded and it didn't offer a solution. It didn't talk about standardizing the training or the policy and, which AB392 as it is being signed today addresses that. 4. SOUNDBITE (English) Hannu Tarjamo, Director, Los Angeles Police Protective League:"We were able to sit down and come up with a version that not everyone got what they wanted but that we can live with it and that we feel like it was a collaborative process."5. SOUNDBITE (English) Hannu Tarjamo, Director, Los Angeles Police Protective League: "I don't know if we're done with the topic. I think this portion of it is done for now but we're always looking to improve the way we do things. I think law enforcement in general is very self-critical about how they use force and how the policies are formed and if there's a better way of doing it we'd like to do that. And I think- but you can't hold people or officers accountable to something they haven't always received training for."6. SOUNDBITE (English) Hannu Tarjamo, Director, Los Angeles Police Protective League:"The end goal with both sides so to speak is the same that we want to you reduce the amount and the incidents of use of force if possible. I think getting there we've taken two different routes but we believe that our way of solving it and we're actually presenting solutions to the problem."STORYLINECalifornia is changing the standards for when police can use lethal force under a law signed Monday that seeks to reduce officer-involved shootings. "It's one thing to sign a piece of paper, pass legislation. It's another to change hearts and minds, to change culture," said Gov. Gavin Newsom as he stood alongside family members of people killed by police.California's old standard has made it rare for police officers to be charged following a shooting and rarer still for them to be convicted. Frequently it's because of the doctrine of reasonable fear: If prosecutors or jurors believe that officers have a reason to fear for their safety, they can use force up to and including lethal force.The law by Democratic Assemblywoman Shirley Weber of San Diego will allow police to use lethal force only when necessary to defend against an imminent threat of death or serious injury to officers or bystanders. But lawmakers dropped an explicit definition of "necessary" that previously had said officers could use deadly force only when there is "no reasonable alternative."One catalyst was last year's fatal shooting of Stephon Clark, an unarmed black man suspected of vandalism whose death sparked major protests in the state capital and reverberated nationwide. Despite the public anger, law enforcement objections stalled the bill last year and even some supporters had reservations until it was amended in May.Hannu Tarjamo, the director of the Los Angeles Police Protective League, said the version of the bill that passed today was a compromise that lawmakers are the police union "can live with."He said the original version of the bill "would've created a real dangerous standard.""I think it could have definitely created a situation where we feel that officers would have been targeted unnecessarily," he said. ===========================================================Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: info@aparchive.com(ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. California Gov. Gavin Newsom has signed a bill designed to decrease the number of deadly shootings by police. The Los Angeles police union says it's a compromise bill that they "can live with." (Aug. 19) Police union 'can live with' use of force law