MSN - AP World http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a MSN - AP World Copyright © 2010-2018 The Canadian Press. All rights reserved. http://www.rssboard.org/rss-specification Sun, 24 Oct 2021 18:24:24 +0000 Structures, lives saved in Calif. Nevada border fire http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a/6ef1624396e348d6a8e612961ddae3c4 The Tamarack Fire south of Lake Tahoe has burned more than 90 square miles of timber in national-forest land and remains at four precent containment. The lightning-sparked blaze has forced evacuations in communities in Nevada and California. (July 23) 6ef1624396e348d6a8e612961ddae3c4 Sat, 24 Jul 2021 01:44:26 +0000 SHOTLIST:RESTRICTION SUMMARY:  ASSOCIATED PRESS  Alpine County, California - 23 July 20211. Various of trees on fire2. A firefighter from the California Dept. of Forestry and Fire Protection (CalFire) stands on top of engine to monitor approaching fire3. Fire moves along dry grass in forest4. CalFire crew holds meeting in front of smoldering forest5. Close up approaching flames 6. Flames spread through forest floor7. CalFire truck in front of smoldering forestASSOCIATED PRESSMinden, Nevada - 23 July 20218. SOUNDBITE (English) Mike DeFries, Public Information Officer, Tamarack Fire Incident Command:"We are in yet another day ahead, in a period right now, where it is just so extremely hot and dry. Fuels are at record or near record levels of dryness. The lack of moisture means everything is ready, everything is explosive. There's a term, fuel driven fire, even with winds. The pinyon, juniper and sage burns so quickly. It means that fire can burn with the winds. Sometimes it actually can burn counter to the wind simply because everything is so dry."ASSOCIATED PRESS  Alpine County, California - 23 July 20219. Various chainsaw crew removing debris along highway in path of the fireASSOCIATED PRESSMinden, Nevada - 23 July 202110. SOUNDBITE (English) Mike DeFries, Public Information Officer, Tamarack Fire Incident Command:"The fire is at about 58 thousand acres. We are still at four percent contained. They did add more containment on the north side of the map today and the fire got a little bit bigger. So the four percent remains the same."ASSOCIATED PRESSGardnerville, Nevada - 23 July 202111. Wide view of Bill & Andrea Miller camp in tent outside evacuation shelter12. SOUNDBITE (English) Bill & Andrea Miller, Evacauees from Markleeville, California:Bill: "We broke down quite a few times at first, but now we just try to joke about it and try to keep a positive attitude."Andrea: "I think that all the volunteers and everyone here who's helping, they're doing a great job."13. Bill & Andrea Miller play with their dogSTORYLINE: The Tamarack Fire south of Lake Tahoe has burned more than 90 square miles of timber in national-forest land and remains at four precent containment. It ignited July 4 and was one of nearly two dozen blazes sparked by lightning strikes.More than 1,200 firefighters are battling the Alpine County blaze, which has destroyed at least 10 buildings, forced evacuations in several communities and closed parts of U.S. 395 in Nevada and California. Crews used chainsaws to remove vegetation along CA-88 to prevent the fire from jumping the highway. Fire officials expect extreme fire behavior this weekend as high winds and temperatures continue.A request for voluntary evacuations was issued for portions of Douglas County, Neveda. An evacuation center was aset up at a community center in Gardnerville, Neveda. Evacuees Bill and Andrea Miller from Markleeville, California have been staying outside the center in a tent.They say they've been dealing with a rollercoaster of emotions, including the panic surrounding the initial evacuation and then finding out that their home has likely been spared.They thanked the community for helping those who've been displaced and stressed that the most important thing is that there have been no reports of injuries due to the fire.Extremely dry conditions and recent heat waves tied to climate change have made wildfires harder to fight.  Climate change has made the West much warmer and drier in the past 30 years and will continue to make weather more extreme and wildfires more frequent and destructive.Gov. Gavin Newsom's office announced Thursday evening that the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection acquired 12 additional firefighting aircraft and nine were immediately dispatched to fires. Cal Fire now has more than 60 airplanes and helicopters.Extremely dry conditions and recent heat waves tied to climate change have made wildfires harder to fight. Climate change has made the West much warmer and drier in the past 30 years and will continue to make weather more extreme and wildfires more frequent and destructive.===========================================================Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: info@aparchive.com(ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. The Tamarack Fire south of Lake Tahoe has burned more than 90 square miles of timber in national-forest land and remains at four precent containment. The lightning-sparked blaze has forced evacuations in communities in Nevada and California. (July 23) Structures, lives saved in Calif. Nevada border fire