MSN - AP World http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a MSN - AP World Copyright © 2010-2018 The Canadian Press. All rights reserved. http://www.rssboard.org/rss-specification Sun, 24 Jan 2021 15:46:23 +0000 Turkey farmer: virus may impact Thanksgiving sales http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a/6d291c9bdc99462aa9ebe71da2d3bad1 Amid the COVID-19 pandemic and restrictions on gatherings, the traditional Thanksgiving feast is being downsized. A California turkey farmer says fewer people at Thanksgiving tables could mean consumers will buy smaller turkeys, or none at all. (Oct. 30) 6d291c9bdc99462aa9ebe71da2d3bad1 Fri, 30 Oct 2020 05:09:46 +0000 SHOTLIST:RESTRICTION SUMMARY:ASSOCIATED PRESSPescadero, California - 21 October 20201. Root Down Farm entrance sign2. Wide of outdoor turkey pen3. Farmer DeDe Boies feeds turkeys++SOUNDBITE PARTIALLY COVERED++4. SOUNDBITE (English) DeDe Boies, Owner, Root Down Farm:"For months now we've been thinking about whether people will even be having holidays, let alone the size of their holiday. And that's such a big piece of the turkeys that we're raising and them being the centerpiece of usually large family gatherings. So for months we've just spin, like, are people going to want turkeys? Are they going to want big turkeys?"5. Various turkeys in pen++SOUNDBITE PARTIALLY COVERED++6. SOUNDBITE (English) DeDe Boies, Owner, Root Down Farm:"It's a little bit scary because I don't actually know. I mean, usually this time last year, we we've sold most of them. So we've been playing with some different ideas. And one, although it has involved a lot of different planning, is to just harvest the birds a little earlier. So they're a little smaller."ASSOCIATED PRESSSan Francisco - 21 October 20207. Exterior of Avedano's Meats butcher shop8. Avedano's Meats Owner Angela Wilson prepares to cut up whole chicken9. Whole chickens in meat counter++SOUNDBITE PARTIALLY COVERED++10. SOUNDBITE (English) Angela Wilson, Owner, Avedano's Meats:"We don't want as many big birds and we think we'll sell smaller birds or different things like porcheta or guinea fowl, quails, fresh game hen. We have beautiful chickens with their head and feet on."11. Wilson breaking down whole chicken12. SOUNDBITE (English) Kelsey Slagle, customer:"For Thanksgiving, usually we do a friendsgiving, about 10 to 15 people over at somebody else's house. This year we're going to be just probably doing it on our own, just ordering a few small things."ASSOCIATED PRESSWashington - 21 October 202013. SOUNDBITE (English) Beth Breeding, VP of Marketing, National Turkey Federation:"While the sides of the gathering might change, the size of the turkey certainly doesn't have to because when you've been cooking as much as we have this year, leftovers are a hot commodity."ASSOCIATED PRESSPescadero, California - 21 October 202014. Various turkeys standing in coop++SOUNDBITE PARTIALLY COVERED++15. SOUNDBITE (English) DeDe Boies, Owner, Root Down Farm:"We've now invested so much time and energy and love into these birds. And the whole point is that they go and they are celebrated with, you know, people for these great meals. So we're just really hoping that that still happens."16. Turkey walks into frameSTORYLINEIt's the Super Bowl for turkey farmers, the time of year when most turkeys are sold.But this year many are worried their biggest birds won't end up on Thanksgiving tables.Due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic and restrictions on large gatherings, the traditional Thanksgiving feast is being downsized.Fewer people at Thanksgiving tables means many families will buy smaller turkeys, or none at all.Farmers, processors and grocery stores are trying to adapt by harvesting turkeys earlier than usual to keep them smaller...or breaking more birds down into bone-in breasts, wings and other parts.Some grocery stores and butcher shops are seeing an increase in orders for small turkeys around ten pounds, rather than the traditional larger turkeys which usually weigh over 20 pounds.Some distributors are offering more turkey alternatives this year, including game fowl like pheasant and quail.According to the National Turkey Federation, around 40 million turkeys are usually eaten around Thanksgiving every year.The federation is hoping consumers will still buy as many large whole turkeys this year and use the leftovers for those always popular next day turkey sandwiches.===========================================================Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: info@aparchive.com(ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. Amid the COVID-19 pandemic and restrictions on gatherings, the traditional Thanksgiving feast is being downsized. A California turkey farmer says fewer people at Thanksgiving tables could mean consumers will buy smaller turkeys, or none at all. (Oct. 30) Turkey farmer: virus may impact Thanksgiving sales