MSN - AP World http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a MSN - AP World Copyright © 2010-2018 The Canadian Press. All rights reserved. http://www.rssboard.org/rss-specification Tue, 22 Oct 2019 00:26:06 +0000 Illegal killings endanger two wolves species http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a/5591b8d76d0949e48c7ceb79d27bd1ea Illegal killings and political resistance have endangered two species of wolves despite more than $80 million in government spending. (May 23) 5591b8d76d0949e48c7ceb79d27bd1ea Thu, 23 May 2019 05:01:38 +0000 RESTRICTION SUMMARY: PART MUST CREDIT YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK SHOTLIST: ASSOCIATED PRESS St. Louis, Missouri, US - 20 May 2019 1. Various of Mexican gray wolves at sanctuary in St. Louis++PARTIALLY COVERED++2. SOUNDBITE: (English) Regina Mossotti, Director of Conservation, Endangered Wolf Center:"So the Mexican wolf and the American red wolf are the two most endangered wolves in the world. The Mexican wolf has about one hundred and fifty individuals out in the wild mostly found in the United States and Arizona and New Mexico. The red wolf is unfortunately worse. They have about thirty individuals left in the wild."3. Various of red wolves and their five-week-old pubs++PARTIALLY COVERED++4. SOUNDBITE (English) Regina Mossotti, Director of Conservation, Endangered Wolf Center:"Their numbers were down so low in the wild that the USA Fish and Wildlife Service actually went out and captured the few remaining of those species and brought them into captivity into zoos to start a breeding program. And once those numbers were up in the zoological community, they actually started the reintroduction back into the wild."++PARTIALLY COVERED++6. SOUNDBITE (English) Regina Mossotti, Director of Conservation, Endangered Wolf Center:"Poaching still an issue and with the Mexican wolf we have seen almost 70 percent of the wolves that have been released since the recovery program started in 1998 have died because of human related causes. We actually take puppies that are born at our center, that are just maybe one to two weeks old. So itty bitty they can fit in the palm of your hand. We fly them down to the recovery area in New Mexico and Arizona. And based on the G.P.S. collar of the wild wolves we can tell where the wild wolf mother's den is, and we sneak our puppies into that wild wolf den. She raises them as her own. So, it gives them a greater chance of surviving. She teaches them how to stay away from people how to hunt dinner, how to protect their territory. Gives them all that knowledge that makes them successful, but also, we snuck new genetics out there. So, when they grow up and breed, they're getting those vital new genetics to keep the population healthy7. Various of gray wolves and pups8. Various of red wolves and their five-week-old pubs YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK – MUST CREDIT YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARKYellowstone National Park - Date unknown9. Wide of female wolf nursing her pubs STORYLINE: The illegal killings of endangered wolves is continuing, frustrating the US government's $80 million (USD) plan to ensure their survival. Officials warn the red wolves of North Carolina could disappear from the wild within a decade. In the Southwest Mexican gray wolves are also struggling despite recent gains. Scientists who've published studies on wolves in Yellowstone National Park say their reintroduction encouraged a regrowth in plants which had died out through overgrazing. The new vegetation reduced soil erosion in streams which helped restore the habitat for fish, birds other species. Biologists say poaching is having a deep impact on wolf populations. "Poaching still an issue and with the Mexican wolf we have seen almost 70 percent of the wolves that have been released since the recovery program started in 1998 have died because of human related causes," said Regina Mossotti, Director of Conservation, Endangered Wolf Centre. The Associated Press found that more than half of Mexican wolf deaths and about one in four red wolf deaths resulted from gunshots, or other illegal killings. Efforts to bolster support for these animals through programs to reintroduce them into the wild has suffered by opposition over attacks on livestock or game animals. A third wolf type the Western gray wolf has thrived since its reintroduction and could soon lose federal protection. Another major obstacle to the restoration of wild wolves is opposition from the public according to biologists. They claim opponents are often fed misinformation about attacks by wolves and there are longstanding arguments over whether the wolves should be treated as a distinct species which warrants protection. In the Southwest, a record number of Mexican gray wolves turned up dead in 2018, tempering an increase in the overall population to 131 animals, but Mossotti says the greatest concern is for the red wolf. "Their numbers were down so low in the wild that the US Fish and Wildlife service actually went out and captured the few remaining of those species and brought them into captivity into zoos to start a breeding program. And once those numbers were up in the zoological community, they actually started the reintroduction back into the wild." U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says shootings are a particular problem when hunting season collides with wolf breeding season. If the situation continues unchecked the wild population of red wolves is likely to be lost within the next decade.programs took over. In the long term centers like this one are hoping to convince people that the wolves are not their enemies, but help to balance an environment to the benefit of all of us. =========================================================== Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: info@aparchive.com(ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. Illegal killings and political resistance have endangered two species of wolves despite more than $80 million in government spending. (May 23) Illegal killings endanger two wolves species