MSN - AP World http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a MSN - AP World Copyright © 2010-2018 The Canadian Press. All rights reserved. http://www.rssboard.org/rss-specification Sun, 24 Oct 2021 19:42:21 +0000 Nashville highway project meant to right old wrong http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a/529beb0ddec2415c9b02548083a2e9eb A Tennessee lawmaker's family lost their home when the interstate decimated a Black neighborhood in Nashville. Now Harold Love Jr. is part of a group pushing to build a cap across the highway to create a community space. (July 22) 529beb0ddec2415c9b02548083a2e9eb Thu, 22 Jul 2021 13:16:29 +0000 SHOTLIST:RESTRICTION SUMMARY: PART MUST CREDIT THE TENNESSEANASSOCIATED PRESSNashville, Tennessee – 19 July 20211. Wide of cars on Interstate 40 in Nashville, TennesseeTHE TENNESSEAN – MUST CREDIT THE TENNESSEAN Nashville, Tennessee – 16 July 19682. STILL of bulldozer clearing the land of what once were homes in North Nashville for the path of Interstate 40 to come throughASSOCIATED PRESSNashville, Tennessee – 19 July 2021++PARTIALLY COVERED++3. SOUNDBITE (English) Harold Love Jr., Tennessee state representative, on his family's fight to try to keep an interstate being built in their neighborhood:"And my father and mother had a house right down there, 2109 Scovel Street. They along with others knew this was not right for the interstate to come through and take their house, to decimate their neighborhood."4. Tight on the deed for Love's family home that was bought and destroyed for the interstate5. Wide of Harold Love Jr. standing on interstate overpass++PARTIALLY COVERED++6. SOUNDBITE (English) Harold Love Jr., Tennessee state representative:"Now we're trying to repair that by putting a cap on top and allowing some of that to be rebuilt. To be able to say, we're now putting grass back where there is concrete."7. Wide of a sign for Fisk University8. Wide of the tiger mascot at Tennessee State UniversityTHE TENNESSEAN – MUST CREDIT THE TENNESSEAN Nashville, Tennessee – 11 October 19679. STILL of Metro Councilmen Harold Love, left, and Z. Alexander Looby listening as Dr. Flournoy Coles expresses opposition of the North Nashville Black community to the proposed plans for routing Interstate Highway I-40 through the area near a press conference at Fisk University ASSOCIATED PRESSNashville, Tennessee – 19 July 2021++PARTIALLY COVERED++10. SOUNDBITE (English) Harold Love Jr., Tennessee state representative, on what it means to him to push for this project:"My father would oftentimes talk about the fact that their house was taken. As an elected official, he could not stop it, not just for himself but for the community."11. Wide of Harold Love Jr. walking and talking to a residentSTORYLINE:Harold Love Jr. has to raise his voice over the blare of traffic from the interstate that was built over his family's home in Nashville, Tennessee, a half century ago.His father, Harold Love, was a city councilman back in the 1960s when Interstate 40 was constructed directly through the predominantly Black part of the city, uprooting families from their homes and demolishing businesses."My father and mother had a house right down there, 2109 Scovel Street," said Love Jr. "They along with others knew this was not right for the interstate to come through and take their house, to decimate their neighborhood. And he along with others began fighting this interstate coming through."His father was sure the impact would stifle the community's economic and cultural support. The area is home to three historically Black colleges, as well as a thriving musical scene.Decades later, Love Jr. wants to correct an old wrong. The state lawmaker is part of a group pushing to build new community space he says would reunify the city directly over Interstate 40, turning the highway stretch below into a tunnel. Possible options include a park, community center, amphitheater, and some way to preserve the historical context about businesses that used to line Jefferson Street, the once-thriving heart of Black Nashville."Now we're trying to repair that by putting a cap on top and allowing some of that to be rebuilt," said Love. "To be able to say, we're now putting grass back where there is concrete."It's also a personal issue to Love and his family."My father would oftentimes talk about the fact that their house was taken," said Love. "As an elected official, he could not stop it, not just for himself but for the community."===========================================================Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: info@aparchive.com(ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. A Tennessee lawmaker's family lost their home when the interstate decimated a Black neighborhood in Nashville. Now Harold Love Jr. is part of a group pushing to build a cap across the highway to create a community space. (July 22) Nashville highway project meant to right old wrong