MSN - AP World http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a MSN - AP World Copyright © 2010-2018 The Canadian Press. All rights reserved. http://www.rssboard.org/rss-specification Thu, 22 Oct 2020 17:21:39 +0000 Aurora, Colorado police chief to fight racial bias http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a/51ebd1649cd64894848a0a70d4bf614f Aurora, Colorado's new police chief is pledging to fight racial bias after the fatal arrest of Elijah McClain and the handcuffing of Black girls over the weekend. Chief Vanessa Wilson apologized to the families in an Associated Press interview. (Aug. 5) 51ebd1649cd64894848a0a70d4bf614f Wed, 05 Aug 2020 22:21:29 +0000 SHOTLIST:RESTRICTION SUMMARY: PART AURORA POLICE DEPARTMENT - MUST CREDITASSOCIATED PRESSAurora, Colorado - 5 August 20201. SOUNDBITE (English) Chief Vanessa Wilson, Aurora Police Department:"I think the call to action across the nation has been heard loud and clear, not only for me as the chief of Aurora, but other chiefs across the nation. And we need to do better and we need to listen to the community and give them a voice and police them the way they want to be policed."2. SOUNDBITE (English) Chief Vanessa Wilson, Aurora Police Department:"I want to apologize again to the Gilliam family. This never, ever should have happened and they never should have been treated that way. It was inhumane and just unbelievable to watch. And I know that people are angry and disgusted by what they saw. And so am I."AURORA POLICE DEPARTMENT - MUST CREDITAurora, Colorado - 24 August 20193. Police bodycam footage of officers confronting Elijah McClainASSOCIATED PRESSAurora, Colorado - 5 August 20204. SOUNDBITE (English) Chief Vanessa Wilson, Aurora Police Department:++COMPLETELY COVERED++"I have made changes around the circumstances of Elijah's case, I've changed the directive on suspicious persons calls, so that if someone is called in as suspicious just due to the color of their skin, that officers don't have to be robotic in that response."ASSOCIATED PRESSAurora, Colorado - 5 August 20205. SOUNDBITE (English) Chief Vanessa Wilson, Aurora Police Department:"Everyone in this country needs to recognize there's implicit bias in each and every one of us, and we have to accept it first. And that's the way we can then check ourselves on."STORYLINE: The new police chief of Aurora, Colorado is pledging to combat racial bias and rebuild community trust after the fatal arrest of Elijah McClain and the handcuffing of Black girls by officers who mistakenly believed they were in a stolen vehicle.Police Chief Vanessa Wilson apologized to the families involved in the two cases in an Associated Press interview Wednesday. The Aurora City Council named Wilson, who was serving as interim chief, to the post in a 10-1 vote Monday night.The new leader of the suburban Denver police department said she wants to empower officers to veer from strict training protocols and think about whether they are acting on their biases."I think the call to action across the nation has been heard loud and clear, not only for me as the chief of Aurora, but other chiefs across the nation," Wilson said. "We need to do better and we need to listen to the community and give them a voice and police them the way they want to be policed."Vanessa Wilson said Wednesday that that the scene of the girls lying on the ground face down next to a suspected stolen car on Sunday, two of them in handcuffs and a 6-year-old girl wearing a pink crown crying for her mother, was "inhumane and just unbelievable to watch."She said it should have never happened had officers used their common sense to respond to what they observed."I know that people are angry and disgusted by what they saw. And so am I," said Wilson.While officers are trained to draw guns and put occupants on the ground when stopping a stolen car because it is considered a high risk operation, when the mother told officers the car was not stolen and that there were children inside, they should have put their guns away and talked to her from a safe distance, Wilson said.Wilson, who is white, has 23 years of experience with the Police Department in Colorado's third-largest city, a diverse community east of Denver. She got the job over three other nationwide finalists - all Black men.While still interim chief, Wilson told her officers they no longer had to contact a person reported to be suspicious as McClain was as he walked home from the store last August, and file a report, if they did not see evidence of a crime being committed because of implicit bias and racism that exists in the world."I have made changes around the circumstances of Elijah's case, I've changed the directive on suspicious persons calls, so that if someone is called in as suspicious just due to the color of their skin, that officers don't have to be robotic in that response," said Wilson.Wilson said in the past residents sometimes complained if they did not see a police presence in response to such calls. She said she needed the community to support this shift and said she would defend her officers' right to use their best judgment.Wilson said everyone, including police, needs to become aware of their implicit biases immediately and then check themselves on whether they are acting on them."Everyone in this country needs to recognize there's implicit bias in each and every one of us, and we have to accept it first," Wilson said. "And that's the way we can then check ourselves on, are we responding because of a personal bias that we're having? Or is it something else?"===========================================================Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: info@aparchive.com(ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. Aurora, Colorado's new police chief is pledging to fight racial bias after the fatal arrest of Elijah McClain and the handcuffing of Black girls over the weekend. Chief Vanessa Wilson apologized to the families in an Associated Press interview. (Aug. 5) Aurora, Colorado police chief to fight racial bias