MSN - AP World http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a MSN - AP World Copyright © 2010-2018 The Canadian Press. All rights reserved. http://www.rssboard.org/rss-specification Wed, 10 Aug 2022 14:55:20 +0000 Nebraska and Colorado face off over water http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a/4650cbdee5a14aa4b563d4ce9bdbe57b Spurred by a climate change-fueled drought, a water rights battle is brewing between Colorado and Nebraska. Nebraska plans to build a canal in Colorado to divert water from the South Platte River, afraid there won’t be enough to go around. (May 18) 4650cbdee5a14aa4b563d4ce9bdbe57b Wed, 18 May 2022 11:05:40 +0000 SHOTLIST: RESTRICTION SUMMARY:++MUSIC CLEARED FOR USE BY AP CLIENTS++ASSOCIATED PRESSJulesburg, Colorado – 28 April 20221. Various aerials of South Platte RiverASSOCIATED PRESSDenver, Colorado – 10 May 20222. Aerial of Denver city skyline with Rocky Mountains in backgroundASSOCIATED PRESSElsie, Nebraska – 30 April 2022+++PARTIALLY COVERED+++3. SOUNDBITE (English) Steve Hanson, Nebraska Rancher:"We see the huge urban developments in Colorado as threatening some of our water. I know that they need water and water's a tough thing to find."ASSOCIATED PRESSJulesburg, Colorado – 28 April 20224. South Platte RiverANNOTATION: A dispute is brewing over the South Platte River that flows through Nebraska and Colorado.ASSOCIATED PRESSFort Morgan, Colorado – 28 April 20225. Aerial of South Platte River winding through farmlandANNOTATION: Almost 100 years ago, the states signed a compact that divided that water during growing season.ASSOCIATED PRESSOgallala, Nebraska – 29 April 20226. Aerial of South Platte River winding through farmlandANNOTATION: It also stated Nebraska could build a canal in Colorado to capture some surplus flows after growing season.ASSOCIATED PRESSElsie, Nebraska – 30 April 20227. Sign post of cowboy on horse near roadANNOTATION: 99 years later, Nebraska is ready to build.ASSOCIATED PRESSOvid, Colorado – 29 April 20228. Tractor drives across fieldANNOTATION: Colorado farmers are bracing for the loss.ASSOCIATED PRESSOvid, Colorado – 29 April 2022+++PARTIALLY COVERED+++9. SOUNDBITE (English) Don Schneider, Colorado Farmer:"We use South Platte water in the wintertime for augmentation which lets water percolate into the ground and replenishes the aquifer. By it doing that, it replaces the water that our irrigation wells pump out to lower the aquifer. So in the wintertime, we replenish that back up, so then we can pump again for another year."10. Augmentation pond11. South Platte water flowing through Peterson Ditch through Don Schneider's farm12. Water pipes on Schneider's farm13. Augmentation pond14. Brady Schneider and Don Schneider talking next to corn planter+++COVERED+++15. SOUNDBITE (English) Don Schneider, Colorado Farmer:"It's very unsettling of what the future could hold for us if we can't pump our wells."16. Don Schneider monitoring his son Bradon driving corn planter through field17. SOUNDBITE (English) Don Schneider, Colorado Farmer:"I'd love to retire in a couple of years. But my 30-year-old son, he…what's he going to do?"ASSOCIATED PRESSDenver, Colorado – 4 May 2022+++PARTIALLY COVERED+++18. SOUNDBITE (English) Jennifer Gimbel, Colorado Water Center:"There's a lot of pressure in the West. First of all, we're an arid country here. We built gardens out of deserts but everyone's feeling that pinch."ASSOCIATED PRESSElsie, Nebraska – 30 April 202219. Wide of Steve Hanson's ranch house20. Steve Hanson pulling on boots21. Wide of pivot irrigation system+++PARTIALLY COVERED+++22. SOUNDBITE (English) Steve Hanson, Nebraska Rancher:"We have about 10,000 acres of farmland. And about 4500 acres of that is irrigated. And the water for that irrigation comes from the overall aquifer. This Perkins County Canal project could make a difference as to how long this is a sustainable, viable project here in Nebraska for us."23. Hanson driving truck around his pivot irrigation system on field24. Tight of aquifer pump25. Various of Hanson holding fistful of feed next to his cattleASSOCIATED PRESSOvid, Colorado – 29 April 202226. Tractor wheels moving over field27. Don Schneider driving tractorASSOCIATED PRESSElsie, Nebraska – 30 April 2022+++COVERED+++28. SOUNDBITE (English) Steve Hanson, Nebraska Rancher:"We're going to have to get along with our neighbors to the West and Colorado. But I would like to see some of that water get over here and used for the purpose it was originally intended for.ASSOCIATED PRESSOgallala, Nebraska – 29 April 202229. South Platte River30. Birds flying over trees during sunsetSTORYLINE:When people think of water issues in the Western U.S., the Colorado River often comes to mind. But a new dispute is brewing over a lesser known Western river, the South Platte.Almost 100 years ago, Nebraska and Colorado signed a compact that divided South Platte water during growing season. It also stated Nebraska could build a canal in Colorado to capture surplus flows after growing season was over.For 99 years, Nebraska officials held off on a canal. But this spring, the state legislature voted to begin funding the project.Colorado farmers are bracing for the impact.On the high plains of northeastern Colorado, Don Schneider is planting hundreds of acres of corn, which he largely irrigates with supply from a shallow aquifer that's connected to the South Platte. In the offseason, he and his neighbors take surplus flows – those that are not owed to anybody – from the river to augment, or replenish the aquifer, which they are required to do to pump it.Through the canal, Nebraska can stake a claim on that surplus water under the compact. Schneider says that means he and his neighbors won't be able to replenish their wells. The alternative - non-irrigated dryland farming - means reduced crop yields, fewer farms and fewer jobs."It's very unsettling of what the future could hold for us if we can't pump our wells," Schneider said. "Our tax base is going to be impacted greatly."Fifth-generation Nebraska cattle breeder Steve Hanson, who produces corn and other crops, supports the canal. Like Schneider and countless others in this semi-arid region, he wants his children and grandchildren to be able to work the rich soil homesteaded by their ancestors in the 1800s.He said he understands that Colorado farmers use surplus flows to replenish their aquifer, but as someone who draws water from the depleted Ogallala Aquifer, any extra supply could help prolong his operation."This Perkins County Canal project could make a difference as to how long this is a sustainable, viable project here in Nebraska for us," Hanson said.Farmers on both sides emphasize they'd like to see a workaround that serves everybody. All agree that a canal project will be years in the making – and that if disputes arise, attorneys specializing in the intricacies of water law or eminent domain could certainly have a field day.===========================================================Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: info@aparchive.com(ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. Spurred by a climate change-fueled drought, a water rights battle is brewing between Colorado and Nebraska. Nebraska plans to build a canal in Colorado to divert water from the South Platte River, afraid there won’t be enough to go around. (May 18) Nebraska and Colorado face off over water