MSN - AP World http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a MSN - AP World Copyright © 2010-2018 The Canadian Press. All rights reserved. http://www.rssboard.org/rss-specification Sat, 10 Dec 2022 04:46:47 +0000 The Ancient Religion of the Columbia River http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a/2beeff205d8748ad9c2c7c1a07d75af2 The Columbia River has sustained Indigenous people for millennia through the harvesting of salmon, roots and berries used in ceremonies and rituals. But dams, climate change, and population growth threaten this way of life. (AP Video: Jessie Wardarski) (Aug. 16) 2beeff205d8748ad9c2c7c1a07d75af2 Tue, 16 Aug 2022 04:00:45 +0000 SHOTLIST:RESTRICTION SUMMARY:ASSOCIATED PRESSBonneville, Oregon - 21 June 20221. Aerial view of the Columbia RiverASSOCIATED PRESS Bingen, Washington- 17 June 2022++SOT COVERED++2. SOUNDBITE (English) Bill Yallup Jr., river chief:"It's our belief that makes the river sacred. ASSOCIATED PRESSLyle, Washington - 19 June 20223. The Lyle Falls on the Klickitat River4. Aerial view of the Klickitat RiverASSOCIATED PRESSThe Dalles, Oregon - 19 June 20225. Aerial view of the Columbia River flowing from The Dalles DamASSOCIATED PRESSBingen, Washington- 17 June 20226. Flowers blowing in the wind ++SOT PARTIALLY COVERED++7. SOUNDBITE (English) Bill Yallup Jr., river chief:"Our prayers and everything, and our understanding of all of us is help the river to maintain a spiritual identity."8. Yallup standing on a cliff overlooking the Columbia RiverASSOCIATED PRESSBonneville, Oregon - 21 June 20229. Indigenous fishing scaffolds on the Columbia River  ASSOCIATED PRESSBonneville, Oregon - 21 June 202210. Betty Jean Sutterlict talking to son as he uses a dip net to fish for salmon11. Aerial view of dip net fishingASSOCIATED PRESSCelilo Village, Oregon - 19 June 202212. Sacred roots harvested by Yakama Nation tribe members 13. The Celilo Village Longhouse 14. Various of food preparation++SOT PARTIALLY COVERED++15. SOUNDBITE (English) Elaine Harvey, biologist for Yakama Nation fisheries:"The Columbia River really brings people together in the springtime. But, you know, we have feasts up and down this river in our families fish. We continue to fish all along the river here."16. Setting the table with the Yakama Nation first foods in order, salmon, roots, berries ASSOCIATED PRESSCascade Locks, Oregon - 21 June 202217. SalmonASSOCIATED PRESSThe Dalles, Oregon - 19 June 202218. Mt. HoodASSOCIATED PRESSCelilo Village, Oregon - 19 June 2022++SOT PARTIALLY COVERED++19. SOUNDBITE (English) Elaine Harvey, biologist for Yakama Nation fisheries:"As river people, you know, we see what's happening in our area there, the increased population, the expansion of cities and rural areas, you know, and progress in general."ASSOCIATED PRESSGoldendale, Oregon - 19 June 202220. Wind turbines ASSOCIATED PRESSCascade Locks, Oregon - 18 June 202221. Windsurfers on the Columbia River ASSOCIATED PRESSCelilo Village, Oregon - 19 June 202222. SOUNDBITE (English) Elaine Harvey, biologist for Yakama Nation fisheries:"The consequences are, you know, on the backs of the environment and the tribes resources."ASSOCIATED PRESSRufus, Oregon - 19 June 202223. Indigenous fishing scaffolds near the John Day Dam ASSOCIATED PRESSThe Dalles, Oregon - 19 June 202224. The Dalles Dam on the Columbia RiverASSOCIATED PRESSUnderwood, Washington - 21 June 202225. The White Salmon River, a tributary of the Columbia RiverASSOCIATED PRESSLyle, Washington - 19 June 202226. Aerial view of Lyle Falls on the Klickitat River27. Yakama Nation elder James Kiona walking toward Lyle Falls on the Klickitat River++SOT PARTIALLY COVERED++28. SOUNDBITE (English) James Kiona, Yakama Nation elder:"That water is our life. That's why we say the river is so sacred because without water man, everything will die."29. Kiona standing on a cliff edge overlooking Lyle FallsASSOCIATED PRESSCascade Locks, Oregon - 18 June 202230. Various of Brigham Campbell dip net fishes along the Columbia RiverASSOCIATED PRESSLyle, Washington - 19 June 2022++COVERED++31. SOUNDBITE (English) James Kiona, Yakama Nation elder:"Our people have done this for lots and lots of years. When you go out, you take your fishing line and you cast it out and you catch a fish and then you feel really good fighting and everything. The exhilaration in the body. And you're fighting that fish and you don't know if you're going to catch him or lose him because you don't know how strong these animals are."32. Various of a dip net used by the indigenous to catch salmon and troutASSOCIATED PRESSCascade Locks, Oregon - 18 June 202233. Various of Campbell dip net fishes along the Columbia River34. People cheering on Campbell as he catches a salmonASSOCIATED PRESSCascade Locks, Oregon - 21 June 202235. Various of Chelsea Quaempts dip net fishingASSOCIATED PRESSBonneville, Oregon - 20 June 2022++SOT PARTIALLY COVERED++36. SOUNDBITE (English) Patricia Whitefoot, Yakama Nation activist:"We have to remember that as human beings, we weren't the first ones here on this land, in our spiritual way of being. We're taught that, you know, the animals and the fish and the birds, the mountains, the water, they were all here. And so, what we do is really a gift, a gift to all of us to support one another, but also to support the river as well. The water, and the fish, the deer, the roots, everything that's in the ground, just Mother Earth in general. So that's our responsibility that we have."37. Various of smoking salmon ASSOCIATED PRESSBonneville, Oregon - 21 June 202238. Various of Sutterlict cutting and prepping salmon to dryASSOCIATED PRESSCascade Locks, Oregon - 18 June 202239. Geese on the Columbia RiverASSOCIATED PRESSCelilo Village, Oregon - 19 June 2022++COVERED++40. SOUNDBITE (English) Elaine Harvey, biologist for Yakama Nation fisheries:"We were always taught to never leave the river under any circumstance. And so, you know, with those teachings from our ancestors and elders we will remain."ASSOCIATED PRESSBonneville, Oregon - 21 June 202241. Trailers at an "in-lieu fishing site," lands set aside by Congress to compensate tribes whose villages were inundated by dams,ASSOCIATED PRESSBonneville, Oregon - 21 June 202242. Various of dip net salmon fishing STORYLINE:For thousands of years, Native tribes have relied on the Columbia River for its salmon and trout, and the surrounding areas for edible roots and medicinal herbs. They believe the river and its resources have been placed there by the Creator to sustain them and they to protect the earth."It's our belief that makes the river sacred," said river chief, Bill Yullup Jr. "Our prayers and everything, and our understanding of all of us is help the river to maintain a spiritual identity."The acts of gathering those foods are linked to the tribes' religious practices, including rituals and ceremonies performed in the longhouse.One of those rituals is for what are called the first foods, salmon, roots and berries. Each year community members are required to wait for that first feast to honor each food before they head out to harvest it."The Columbia River really brings people together in the springtime," said Elaine Harvey, a Biologist for the Yakama Nation fisheries. "We have feasts up and down this river in our families fish. We continue to fish all along the river here."The salmon are the first to appear in the spring and have been caught by men and women for generations. But this way of life along the river is under threat. "As river people, you know, we see what's happening in our area there, the increased population, the expansion of cities and rural areas, you know, and progress in general, said Harvey. "The consequences are on the backs of the environment and the tribes resources."With warming temperatures linked to climate change, four major hydroelectric dams, and industrial pollution, the salmon are endangered and the increasingly warm water is becoming contaminated.Yakama Nation Elder, James Kiona, described the water as life. "We say the river is so sacred because without water man, everything will die."Kiona describes the act of harvesting salmon and trout as a fight, as "exhilarating." He said it's something his people have done for many years. With this deep-rooted connection to the river, there's also a duty to protect it for the future generations."We have to remember that as human beings, we weren't the first ones here on this land, in our spiritual way of being. We're taught that, you know, the animals and the fish and the birds, the mountains, the water, they were all here," said Patricia Whitefoot, a Yakama Nation activist. "So what we do is really a gift, a gift to all of us to support one another, but also to support the river as well" ... "That's our responsibility that we have."Some fear, if it's not preserved, they risk losing not only the foods that the river helps supply, but also their spiritual identity.But Harvey says no matter the circumstances, her people will remain on the river.___Associated Press religion coverage receives support through the AP's collaboration with The Conversation US, with funding from Lilly Endowment Inc. The AP is solely responsible for this content.===========================================================Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: info@aparchive.com(ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. The Columbia River has sustained Indigenous people for millennia through the harvesting of salmon, roots and berries used in ceremonies and rituals. But dams, climate change, and population growth threaten this way of life. (AP Video: Jessie Wardarski) (Aug. 16) The Ancient Religion of the Columbia River