MSN - AP World http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a MSN - AP World Copyright © 2010-2018 The Canadian Press. All rights reserved. http://www.rssboard.org/rss-specification Sun, 24 Jan 2021 15:16:19 +0000 NYC hospitals prepared for COVID resurgence http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a/29c49f6835524f0da8053e1292f4264e Hospital officials at one of the largest health care networks in New York City are cautiously optimistic they are prepared for a second wave of coronavirus infections. (Oct. 30) 29c49f6835524f0da8053e1292f4264e Fri, 30 Oct 2020 05:07:42 +0000 SHOTLIST:RESTRICTION SUMMARY: ++SOUNDBITES PARTIALLY COVERED BY VIDEO++ASSOCIATED PRESS New York - 28 October 2020 1. Wide of an entrance to Bellevue Hospital, now contained within an atrium 2. SOUNDBITE (English) Eric Wei, Senior Vice President/Chief Quality Officer for NYC Health + Hospitals:"I would say cautiously optimistic (referring to NYC hospitals being prepared for a "second wave" of COVID-19 cases.) We have way more testing. We'll get results way quicker. So, I think we have some tools in our tool belt this time around to, you know, control any sort of mini outbreaks." 3. One of 37 new ICU rooms created since the coronavirus outbreak at the hospital, added onto 55 existing ICU beds4. SOUNDBITE (English) Eric Wei, Senior Vice President/Chief Quality Officer for NYC Health + Hospitals:"A lot of things that we have in place now that make us believe that we won't see something as bad as the first wave in March and April is that we know that the virus is out there, people are taking precautions, especially New Yorkers who, look around everyone's wearing masks. People are social distancing."5. Wide of sign reading (English): "Bellevue Hospital Crushing the COVID-19"6. People walking at Bellevue Hospital++ZOOM RECORDING, QUALITY AS INCOMING++ 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Laura Iavicoli, Senior Assistant VP for Emergency Management for NYC Health + Hospitals:"We're starting to wonder if this is going to be more of a sustained, lower-level surge."8. Nurse at desk, monitoring patient rooms through new cameras 9. Shot of patient rooms on nurse's computer monitor++ZOOM RECORDING, QUALITY AS INCOMING++ 10. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Laura Iavicoli, Senior Assistant VP for Emergency Management for NYC Health + Hospitals:"Potentially the inoculum (referring to the viral load) is less because everybody's wearing masks."11. Dr. Amit Uppal, (pronounced 'AH-m-eh-t OO-pull'), setting room to negative pressure 12. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Amit Uppal, Medical Director of Critical Care at Bellevue Hospital:"Tremendously increased our capacity to isolate patients."13. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Amit Uppal, Medical Director of Critical Care at Bellevue Hospital:"We (referring to nurses, doctors, social workers, etc.) turn the fans on to generate a negative pressure and the actual negative pressure in the room would be displayed on the monitor. And above our heads, every single room is outfitted with a ping pong ball in a tube. And so, when the room is under the negative pressure that we would consider safe for a patient with an infectious pathogen, that ball will actually be pulled into the room, which makes it easy for our staff to glance up quickly before they enter a room and confirm that room is under negative pressure." 14. Pink ping pong ball is sucked back indicating the room is under negative pressure 15. A vent in a patient's room taking air from the room, sending it through a HEPA filter before delivering outside16. Pink ping pong ball is sucked back indicating the room is under negative pressure17. Uppal closing new thick glass doors that have been added to patient rooms18. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Amit Uppal, Medical Director of Critical Care at Bellevue Hospital:"The reason that's so important is that if a patient is in that room with an infectious pathogen and they're coughing into the air, we want to know the air that they're coughing out is not going to come out into our hallway or where it could affect our health care workers or other patients. We want to know that it's going to be safely exhausted." ++EDIT ENDS ON A SOUNDBITE++ STORYLINE:Like battle-hardened veterans, New York City hospitals and nursing homes are bracing for a potential resurgence of coronavirus patients, drawing on lessons learned this spring when the outbreak brought the nation's largest city to its knees.The new playbook derives from the apocalyptic days of March and April, when testing and resources were scarce, emergency rooms overflowed and funeral homes stacked corpses in refrigerated trailers.Those insights, however hard won, make it far less likely that the city's hospitals would collapse under a second wave of COVID-19, health care leaders said.Even without a vaccine, doctors are touting increasingly effective coronavirus treatments, three-month supplies of personal protective equipment and contingency staffing plans.Similar preparations are underway at New York's hard hit nursing homes, which accounted for a staggering percentage of the state's coronavirus deaths.Widespread testing for the new coronavirus is underway throughout the city and because people are wearing masks, those who are infected will have less severe cases because their exposure to the virus is less intense. Data shows many new infections are among young people and they are less likely than older patients to need hospitalization. NYC Health + Hospital runs eleven hospitals, five skilled nursing homes, a long-term acute care hospital and 70 clinics in New York City. To battle the coronavirus, they've implemented new measures across their system. At Bellevue Hospital, they've upped the number of Intensive Care Unit rooms from 55 to 92. The rooms now have thick glass doors and negative pressure can be introduced into each room with the flip of switch, meaning air infected with the coronavirus can be safely contained and decontaminated. They've upgraded the capacity to deliver large amounts of oxygen to large amounts of patients without having to ration. COVID-19 patients often suffer kidney failure, so there is now extensive plumbing to support dialysis. Health care workers say they are much more conservative now about when to put a patient on a ventilator.  Pre-COVID-19 pandemic conventional wisdom was to put a patient with low oxygen levels on a ventilator. But the COVID-19 sickness is unique in that patients can often recover using non-invasive ventilation such as high flow nasal cannula or BiPAP (Bilevel positive airway pressure). The hospital also has on hand large supplies of Remdesivir and convalescent plasma to treat COVID-19 patients. New York has recorded nearly 37,000 new COVID-19 infections in October and is on track to have more than double the number of people sickened this month than those that fell ill in September.But so far, that increase has led to only a modest uptick in hospitalizations. On average, about 45 people a day have been admitted to New York City hospitals in October, city statistics show, up from an average of 29 per day in September.That compares to an average 1,600 per day during the worst two weeks of the pandemic in March and April — a time when the state also recorded its highest daily death tolls and ambulance sirens became an ominous soundtrack, seemingly playing on repeat, to the city's out-of-control pandemic. Last week, by contrast, the city's 11 public hospitals had six total intubated patients — down from a peak of 960. ===========================================================Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: info@aparchive.com(ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. Hospital officials at one of the largest health care networks in New York City are cautiously optimistic they are prepared for a second wave of coronavirus infections. (Oct. 30) NYC hospitals prepared for COVID resurgence