MSN - AP World http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a MSN - AP World Copyright © 2010-2018 The Canadian Press. All rights reserved. http://www.rssboard.org/rss-specification Wed, 26 Jun 2019 03:47:16 +0000 Justices seem ready to OK asking citizenship on census http://syn2.thecanadianpress.com:8080/mrss/feed/fcf7391a2f354311807f0501c16bde6a/0944840828994361a6c30dd5321aeacf The Supreme Court's conservative majority seemed ready Tuesday to uphold the Trump administration's plan to ask about citizenship on the 2020 census, despite evidence that millions of Hispanics and immigrants could go uncounted. (April 23) 0944840828994361a6c30dd5321aeacf Tue, 23 Apr 2019 20:48:28 +0000 RESTRICTION SUMMARY: AP CLIENTS ONLY SHOTLIST: ASSOCIATED PRESS - AP CLIENTS ONLY Washington, DC - 23 April 20191. Wide of Supreme Court with people on sidewalk (PARTIALLY COVERS UPCOMING SOUNDBITE)2. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Sherman, Associated Press:"The Supreme Court heard arguments today in one of the most significant cases of its term about whether the 2020 census can include a question asking everybody whether they're a citizen of the United States. It's a question that the Trump administration wants to add and that various states and cities and immigrant rights and other groups oppose. And the reason that this is important is because the results of the census will help determine the allocation of seats in the House of Representatives among the states as well as the allocation of of billions of dollars in federal money over the next 10 years."++WHITE FLASH++3. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Sherman, Associated Press:"The challengers, in this case, say that immigrants and Hispanics will be much less likely to answer a question about the census -- about citizenship on the census and perhaps respond to the census at all. If this question is included and that will make the results of the census less rather than more accurate. That's a view that is shared by the experts at the Census Bureau as well. But the administration says it wants to push forward with this question basically because the provision of information about citizenship will help the Justice Department enforce a federal law known as the Voting Rights Act." POOL - AP CLIENTS ONLY Washington - 30 November 20184. Wide of U.S. Supreme Court justices posing for class photo, from left to right (starting from bottom row): Associate Justice Stephen Breyer, Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, Chief Justice of the U.S. John Roberts, Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Associate Justice Samuel Alito, Jr., (from top) Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch, Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Associate Justice Elena Kagan and Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh (PARTIALLY COVERS UPCOMING SOUNDBITE) ASSOCIATED PRESS - AP CLIENTS ONLY Washington, DC - 23 April 20195. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Sherman, Associated Press:"The five Supreme Court conservative justices didn't seem particularly bothered by the lower court rulings against the question or by the claims that the challengers put forward. They seem more ready to accept the arguments that the administration made defending the use of the citizenship question on the 2020 census. The question itself hasn't been asked of everybody since 1950. Although before that a citizen question of some kind was fairly common on the census."6. Wide of Supreme Court  (PARTIALLY COVERS PREVIOUS SOUNDBITE) STORYLINE: The Supreme Court's conservative majority seemed ready Tuesday to uphold the Trump administration's plan to ask about citizenship on the 2020 census, despite evidence that millions of Hispanics and immigrants could go uncounted. There appeared to be a clear divide between the court's liberal and conservative justices in arguments in a case that could affect how many seats states have in the House of Representatives and their share of federal dollars over the next 10 years. States with a large number of immigrants tend to vote Democratic. Three lower courts have so far blocked the plan to ask every U.S. resident about citizenship in the census, finding that the question would discourage many immigrants from being counted. Associated Press reporter Mark Sherman said, "The five Supreme Court conservative justices didn't seem particularly bothered by the lower court rulings against the question or by the claims that the challengers put forward.  They seem more ready to accept the arguments that the administration made defending the use of the citizenship question on the 2020 census." The last time the question was included on the census form sent to every American household was 1950. =========================================================== Clients are reminded: (i) to check the terms of their licence agreements for use of content outside news programming and that further advice and assistance can be obtained from the AP Archive on: Tel +44 (0) 20 7482 7482 Email: info@aparchive.com(ii) they should check with the applicable collecting society in their Territory regarding the clearance of any sound recording or performance included within the AP Television News service (iii) they have editorial responsibility for the use of all and any content included within the AP Television News service and for libel, privacy, compliance and third party rights applicable to their Territory. The Supreme Court's conservative majority seemed ready Tuesday to uphold the Trump administration's plan to ask about citizenship on the 2020 census, despite evidence that millions of Hispanics and immigrants could go uncounted. (April 23) Justices seem ready to OK asking citizenship on census